Field Museum of Natural History

Official Homepage: www.fieldmuseum.org

Fee: $15

Sun. 9 AM–5 PM
Mon. 9 AM–5 PM
Tue. 9 AM–5 PM
Wed. 9 AM–5 PM
Thu. 9 AM–5 PM
Fri. 9 AM–5 PM
Sat. 9 AM–5 PM
Monthly Free Days
  • 2nd Mondays 9 AM–5 PM
Staticmap?size=240x130&markers=41.8651984,-87
1400 S Lake Shore Dr
Chicago, Chicago 60605
(312) 922-9410

Check the Field Museum of Natural History website for additional hours, special pricing/discounts, and closure dates.

Nearby

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The complete Tyrannosaurus rex ever discovered, Sue, at Chicago's Field Museum of Natural History. Taken from second floor of the museum.
The Field Museum of Natural History (website) is a Museum (Science) in Chicago.
Official description from Field Museum of Natural History:
The Field Museum was incorporated in the State of Illinois on September 16, 1893 as the Columbian Museum of Chicago with its purpose the "accumulation and dissemination of knowledge, and the preservation and exhibition of objects illustrating art, archaeology, science and history." In 1905, the Museum's name was changed to Field Museum of Natural History to honor the Museum's first major benefactor, Marshall Field, and to better reflect its focus on the natural sciences. In 1921 the Museum moved from its original location in Jackson Park to its present site on Chicago Park District property near downtown where it is part of a lakefront Museum Campus that includes the John G. Shedd Aquarium and the Adler Planetarium. These three institutions are regarded as among the finest of their kind in the world and together attract more visits annually than any comparable site in Chicago.
Wikipedia excerpt:
The Field Museum of Natural History is located in Chicago, Illinois, USA. It sits on Lake Shore Drive next to Lake Michigan, part of a scenic complex known as the Museum Campus Chicago. The museum collections contain over 21 million specimens, of which only a small portion are ever on display. The Field Museum was incorporated in the State of Illinois on September 16, 1893 as the Columbian Museum of Chicago with its purpose the "accumulation and dissemination of knowledge, and the preservation and exhibition of artifacts illustrating art, archaeology, science and history." The museum was originally housed in the World's Columbian Exposition's Palace of Fine Arts (which is today home to the Museum of Science and Industry). In 1905, the museum's name was changed to Field Museum of Natural History to honor the museum's first major benefactor, Marshall Field, and to better reflect its focus on natural history. In 1921, the museum moved from its original location to its present site on Chicago Park District property near downtown, where it is part of the lakefront Museum Campus that includes the John G. Shedd Aquarium and the Adler Planetarium. In 2006, the Field Museum was the number one cultural attraction in Chicago but surrendered the title in 2007 to the Shedd Aquarium.

Promotional images for exhibits from Field Museum of Natural History official site

Current Exhibitions

Sue2
Now Ongoing
No dinosaur in the world compares to SUE—the largest, most complete, and best preserved Tyrannosaurus rex ever discovered.
Antsexhibits0
Jul 30, 2010 – Jan 01, 2012
Get a rare look at the life of Field Museum scientist Dr. Corrie Moreau, and learn how her childhood love for insects spurred a career dedicated to researching ants.
Insideancientegyptexhibits0
Now Ongoing
Unlock the secrets of tombs, mummies, marshes and more.
Official Field Museum of Natural History Links
aGogh in Chicago

Note: This site is still in a alpha, unfinished form. The information for aGogh was almost entirely hand-gathered and so there may be errors and omissions. See an error? Contact us.

Membership

The Field Museum of Natural History is supported by a membership program. See their pricing and benefits.


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